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Banning cellphones may interrupt learning

Author: Lisa Nielsen URL: http://theinnovativeeducator.blogspot.com/2014/04/students-parents-teachers-principals.html “The only difference between smartphones and laptops is that cell phones are smaller, cheaper, and more coveted by students” (Richtel & Stone, 2009). Students, parents, teachers, principals, and elected officials know it is time to lift restrictions and embrace these tools for learning. Below is their wisdom and the research to support it. Students In general, 95% of teens use the internet and 74% are “mobile internet users” (Pew, 2013). With or without us, students are using cell phones for learning despite the perception by some parents and teachers that cell phones are distracting to kids. A national study shows that 1 in 3 middle

Technology’s Effect on Education

Susie Valenzuela, Middle School Teacher, El Paso Independent School District, Texas   In today’s technology-driven world, there is growing aspiration by both administrators and students to use technology in the classroom. It is not uncommon to tour a school campus today and see students on cell phones, tablet PCs and laptop computers surfing the Internet, updating social network sites or downloading music and videos. This shouldn’t come as a shock however, as our society is clearly moving to a more technical and computerized age. There are benefits that can come from integrating technology in the classroom. Unfortunately, most veteran teachers are from a much different, less connected generation than the

5 Reasons to Allow Students to Use Cell Phones in Class

Author : Michael Soskil (from The Innovative Educators Blog of Lisa Nielsen) URL : : http://theinnovativeeducator.blogspot.com/2012/07/5-reasons-to-allow-students-to-      use-cell.html This morning, a discussion between members of my PLN on Plurk got me thinking about rules in school that ban cell phone usage.  In today’s post I’m going to explore five reasons why banning cell phones in schools is bad policy and detrimental for our students.

Cell Phones: Tools of engagement or distraction?

Author: Lisa Nielsen URL: http://theinnovativeeducator.blogspot.com/2012/10/cell-phones-tools-of-engagement-or.html I have the opportunity to speak with Greg Graham author of Cell Phones in Classrooms? No! Students Need to Pay Attention on BAM Radio’s Educator’s Channel.  As the author of Teaching Generation Text, which encourages students to use the devices they own and love for learning, it is no surprise we disagree on the subject.  Graham is one of those educators who has yet to update his outdated practices and is holding students prisoners of his past.  To justify this, he uses advice that creative thinker, speaker, and writer Howard Rheingold. Rule Number One is to pay attention. Rule Number Two: Attention is a limited resource, so

Banning cellphones may interrupt learning

Author: Lisa Nielsen

URL: http://theinnovativeeducator.blogspot.com/2014/04/students-parents-teachers-principals.html

Photo credits to the owner.

“The only difference between smartphones and laptops is that cell phones are smaller, cheaper, and more coveted by students” (Richtel & Stone, 2009). Students, parents, teachers, principals, and elected officials know it is time to lift restrictions and embrace these tools for learning. Below is their wisdom and the research to support it.

Students
In general, 95% of teens use the internet and 74% are “mobile internet users” (Pew, 2013). With or without us, students are using cell phones for learning despite the perception by some parents and teachers that cell phones are distracting to kids. A national study shows that 1 in 3 middle schoolers are using their devices to complete homework and learn better (Tru, 2012).
“… with cell phones tucked in the book bags and pockets of three-fourths of today’s teens, many high schools are ceding defeat in the battle to keep hand-held technology out of class and instead are inviting students to use their phones for learning” (Malone & Black, 2010).
Nationally, just over half (52%) of teachers of upper and upper-middle income students say their students use cell phones to look up information in class, compared with 35% of teachers of the lowest income students (Pew Research Center, 2013).
More than half of the world’s population now owns a cell phone, and children under 12 constitute one of the fastest growing segments of mobile technology users in the U.S. according to the The Joan Ganz Cooney Center at Sesame Workshop (Shuler, 2009).

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Technology’s Effect on Education

Susie Valenzuela, Middle School Teacher, El Paso Independent School District, Texas

 

Photo credits to the owner.

In today’s technology-driven world, there is growing aspiration by both administrators and students to use technology in the classroom. It is not uncommon to tour a school campus today and see students on cell phones, tablet PCs and laptop computers surfing the Internet, updating social network sites or downloading music and videos. This shouldn’t come as a shock however, as our society is clearly moving to a more technical and computerized age. There are benefits that can come from integrating technology in the classroom. Unfortunately, most veteran teachers are from a much different, less connected generation than the students they are working with. It is not unusual to see students who are more technologically savvy than their mentors who are four or five times their age.

Read more

5 Reasons to Allow Students to Use Cell Phones in Class

Author : Michael Soskil (from The Innovative Educators Blog of Lisa Nielsen)
URL :http://theinnovativeeducator.blogspot.com/2012/07/5-reasons-to-allow-students-to-      use-cell.html

Photo credits to the owner.

This morning, a discussion between members of my PLN on Plurk got me thinking about rules in school that ban cell phone usage.  In today’s post I’m going to explore five reasons why banning cell phones in schools is bad policy and detrimental for our students.

Cell Phones: Tools of engagement or distraction?

Author: Lisa Nielsen

URL: http://theinnovativeeducator.blogspot.com/2012/10/cell-phones-tools-of-engagement-or.html

Photo credits to the owner.

I have the opportunity to speak with Greg Graham author of Cell Phones in Classrooms? No! Students Need to Pay Attention on BAM Radio’s Educator’s Channel.  As the author of Teaching Generation Text, which encourages students to use the devices they own and love for learning, it is no surprise we disagree on the subject.  Graham is one of those educators who has yet to update his outdated practices and is holding students prisoners of his past.  To justify this, he uses advice that creative thinker, speaker, and writer Howard Rheingold.

  1. Rule Number One is to pay attention.
  2. Rule Number Two: Attention is a limited resource, so pay attention to where you pay attention.

Read more


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